Breaking News

I am a paper snob.
I work at two newspapers, I do not own an e-reader, and I journal in a notebook. However, even I must admit that when it comes to breaking news, despite all my pretentious, old-fashioned instincts, I have become dependent on Twitter.

I marvel at the speed that international news is delivered to the palm of my hand. When legendary sci-fi author Terry Pratchett passed away, I knew within six minutes of the announcement leaking out to the world by, of course, his Twitter account. I was amazed. Just 20 years ago when you died, it would probably take until several hours later or possibly the next day for the public to know, and now, billions of people can know in mere minutes. There are countless online news websites that are updated every minute of the day, and social media can spread news faster than I could even write it down.

As a journalist (and snob), I admit that this radical change of how news is delivered and absorbed is daunting. I am stuck between my love of the smell of newsprint and the thrill of seeing my own words on a page, and the fact that I run three blogs and that my work portfolio for my first job outside of college will be a website, and not a folder of clippings.
I know that online news is not just the way of the futureā€”it’s already the way of the present. The thing is, I still love reading papers, but simply for different reasons than online news appeals to me. Papers are fantastic for profiles, features, and in-depth information on stories you can get in brief articles or 140-character blurbs. Papers have character, unique thought, and a design completely different than a web page. And frankly, there is something very satisfyingly permanent about seeing your name in print, whether in a story or a byline.

I will continue to read and work for print publications until either they or I cease to exist, whichever comes first. But I now accept the internet as my primary breaking news source with open arms. My mind can be at peace knowing that print newspapers and online news sources are not in competition, they are simply two different animals. And I am both a dog and a cat person.

Generic Coffee Shop Blog Post

I have nothing better to do with my lazy Sunday night then sit in the coffee shop and people watch.

Nothing of relevance happened this week to post about, really. I turned 19. Not to sound cynical, but big whoop. It’s no more or less exciting being 19 than it is 18. I didn’t magically become a little older, a little more beautiful. I did the same BS as I do every other day, every other week. Overate, drove erratically, spent way too much money, cried, procrastinated on homework but managed to get it done by the end of the weekend. Skipped a little more class than usual because of a small mental breakdown on Wednesday night. Regular college stuff, really.

Honestly, I am such a lame-o, generic hipster right now, it is killing me. I’m sitting in a college coffee shop, blogging about my goddamn week as a white girl at a private school on a macbook air, with my lame Ray-ban glasses (which are prescription, thanks for asking; I’d be close to legally blind without these) and my lame hipster canvas backpack with handmade heart pins that say things like “nope” and “babe,” and “just stop,” wearing an outfit that’s entirely thrifted, aside from my shoes, which are TOMS.

If you look at me, I’m scowling the generic hipster mad-about-life, everyone-is-lame-but-me scowl. However, this scowl is not for those reasons. It is for these reasons:

1. It is my natural expression because I have chronic Brooklyn Bitchface. It’s in my genes. Thanks, dad.

2. I am not displeased with the world so much as just myself, and I am definitely the lamest person in this room. It’s super contradictory: I like myself right now, but also I really effing hate myself because good god, I am everything I wanted to be in high school. And that’s gross.

I look so insanely lame I almost can’t even handle it. Yet I continue to sit here and write this like the boring hipster teenager I am because I should be doing better and more interesting things, but I’m not. I could be reading a good book, or actually ordering a goddamn coffee, or watching the movie the rest of my friends are watching. However, I had homework to do, so I skipped the movie and finished a paper in the library (so lame, I am so lame), and now I’m just killing time by looking like an ass in public, texting my boyfriend, and listening to Iron and Wine. Yippee.

What will I do tomorrow? Will I somehow suck less? I’m not sure.

This is what I do know: don’t judge the generic hipster bitch in the coffee shop by her external scowl and weird shoes. She is actually probably a really interesting person under that thick outer layer of nonchalance. She probably really wants to make new friends but is bad at talking to people out of the blue in public places. She knows you’re looking at her with either admiration (because sadly, just like high school Sarah, there are people who want to look like I do now) or disgust because of the stereotype she’s exuding. But she’s not all bad. She has valid opinions, she likes her bagels a certain way, she still knocks on wood when she’s afraid of bad luck, and she’s quietly playing Clash of Clans with her boyfriend while nobody’s looking.

She may look unapproachable, but she’s trying to fix that, too.